Building (destroyed)

Church builders Juhana ja Matti Salonen, peruskorjaus 1877–96 arkkitehti Ivar Aminoff

Wood

Kisamäki (9) Ivar Aminoff (4) church (1) bell tower (1) Helylä (4) 1893 (25) Toivo Jaatinen (1) 1812 (7) Berndt Godenhjelm (3) 1940 (69) Kuorikoski (5) Juhana Salonen (3) Toivo (4) Rupture war (1) Alopaeus (11) Adam Alopaeus (1) Matti Salonen (3) Lutheran church (1) Sortavala (112) 1801 (6) Kirkkoniemi (8) rock (3) Aminoff (9) Matti (9)


The first Lutheran church in Sortavala was built in Helylä in 1643. After a little over a decade, it was destroyed during the so called Rupture War and later in the Russian occupation in early 18th century. The next church was completed in Kirkkoniemi in 1740, which at the time was still outside town limits. The construction of the church was hastily done: soft, clayey soil was chosen as the location, and the building soon began to fall into disrepair to an extent that it was deemed was deemed hazardous for church goers. In 1777, a permit was granted to build a new church, with the rocky Kisamäki hill as the location. The work to build a new Lutheran church to Kisamäki was started in 1799. The builders were Juhana and Matti Salonen from Savitaipale. The church was adopted into use with dirt floor in 1801. The church represented a centralised style, where the cross-shaped centre expanded into a large square-shaped church hall.
In the beginning, the church made use of the old Kirkkoniemi bell tower, until Adam Alopaeus from Kesälahti built a new one after the Finnish War in 1812. Between 1843 and 1844, the church building was finalised by Erik Kuorikoski, who also repaired the bell tower. In the end, the church that had been under construction for a total of 45 years before its final dedication and adoption into use. The new altarpiece, a replica of Rafael's the Resurrection of Christ, was commissioned from artist Berndt Godenhjelm in 1859. Renovation and alteration works were carried out at the Lutheran church between 1893 and 1894 according to the plan of province architect Ivar Aminoff. Aminoff was unreserved about mixing influences from different styles, such as Gothic architecture and Russian brick churches. The end result was muddled to say the least, but the parishioners were happy as the church gained more space and light. The Kisamäki Lutheran church burned to the ground as a result of an air raid by Soviet planes on 2 February 1940. In 1995, a memorial plate made by Toivo Jaatinen was affixed to the Kisamäki rock in memory of the church.

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